Blood in the Sand


Canada sacrificed 159 of her Sons and Daughters during the War on Terror in Afghanistan, this war lasted from 2001 to 2014, a full 13 years of training, fighting and patrolling in the desert. The feelings are still fresh from this war and there is many unanswered questions. I created this page to help honor and preserve the memory of those who gave their lives in the defense of freedom, not just at home but for everyone in the world.  

LEST WE FORGET


Private Richard Anthony Green

Son of Mrs. Doreen Janet Coolen of Hubbards, Nova Scotia.  He along with 3 others died during a night-time exercise south of Kandahar on April 17, 2002. A U.S. military pilot fired a laser-guided bomb at the Canadians when he mistook their muzzle flashes for enemy artillery fire. He was serving with the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

This piece from a local news article speaks to the heartbreak and sorrow that surrounds the deaths of these heroes. 

"Miranda Boutilier, Green’s fiancee, did not speak during the service, although her sobs could be heard throughout, an unsettling counterpoint to the hymns and eulogies. She embraced the casket before it was wheeled out of the church, so bereft she had to be pulled away. Photographers caught the image and in a photo that ran in newspapers the following day, an engagement ring could be clearly seen on the wedding finger of her left hand.
The ring had been found in Green’s pocket the day he died."


Richard Anthony Green was twenty-one.


Corporal Ainsworth Dyer

Son of the late Paul and Agatha Dyer of St. Laurent, Quebec.  He along with 3 others died during a night-time exercise south of Kandahar on April 17, 2002. A U.S. military pilot fired a laser-guided bomb at the Canadians when he mistook their muzzle flashes for enemy artillery fire. He was serving with the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

He also served as a Rifleman and was deployed on Operation Palladium to Bosnia-Herzegovina in 2000. Always looking to challenge himself, Ainsworth trained for the “Mountain Man” competition, the blood and guts of the light infantry soldier. He also conquered the skies and became a paratrooper. His sense of adventure complemented his strong temperament.

In the words of retired Sgt. Oswald Reece, who trained Ainsworth as a young recruit, “he was a standout person; he was always ready to step up to the plate; he was the perfect soldier.”


Sergeant Marc Daniel Léger

Son of Richard and Claire Léger of Stittsville, Ontario. He along with 3 others died during a night-time exercise south of Kandahar on April 17, 2002. A U.S. military pilot fired a laser-guided bomb at the Canadians when he mistook their muzzle flashes for enemy artillery fire. He was serving with the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. He had previously served in Bosnia and I have included some of his incredible exploits.

Sgt.Leger badgered the local UN representative and any aid agency that drove through the area for supplies for six months. He took leftover and thrown-away building supplies and distributed them while on patrol. He snuck food from the camp kitchen and spirited off the camp water truck when no one was looking. He even managed to pry money from the Canadian International Development Agency to re-roof 28 local houses. One re-roofed house is emblazoned with the Canadian Maple Leaf and the CIDA logo. When the Serbs in the Livno Valley learned of Sergeant Marc Leger’s death, they mourned. One said, “We never could have returned to this valley without the help of that big Canadian soldier.”

For his work in Bosnia, Marc was awarded the Deputy Chief of Defence Staff Commendation. He was also awarded the South West Asia Medal and United States Bronze star posthumously.


Private Nathan Lloyd Smith

Son of Lloyd and Charlotte Lynn Smith of Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia. He along with 3 others died during a night-time exercise south of Kandahar on April 17, 2002. A U.S. military pilot fired a laser-guided bomb at the Canadians when he mistook their muzzle flashes for enemy artillery fire. He was serving with the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

His hobbies included scuba diving, running and reading anything to do with the military.  Upon his Death as per his request his ashes were scattered in Peggys Cove in his beloved home province of Nova Scotia.


Corporal Robbie Christopher Beerenfenger

Son of Wilhelmina Beerenfenger-Koehler of Embrun, Ontario. He was killed on duty near Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 2, 2003. He was at the time on patrol in an Iltis jeep when it ran over an explosive device while serving with 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment.

"Even though Cpl. Robbie Beerenfenger's wife had just given birth to their fourth child, he didn't think twice when he got the call to serve in Kabul. He believed in this mission and his sense of duty drowned out any worries he had about leaving his wife, Tina, and their children behind at CFB Petawawa. "Everyone in the family is devastated. We're still in tears," the elder Beerenfenger said from his home in Carleton Place, near Ottawa."


Sergeant Robert Alan Short

Son of Murray Donald Short of Fredericton, New Brunswick. He was killed on duty near Kabul, Afghanistan, on October 2, 2003. He was on the same patrol with Cpl. Beerenfenger when they ran over an explosive device. He was also serving with 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment.

Sgt. Short grew up in Fredericton and once worked as a contract logger, he was known to be a committed soldier and an entertaining musician. He came from a proud military family and his death was felt particulary hard for them. 


Corporal Jamie Brendan Murphy

Son of Norman and Alice Murphy of Conception Harbor, Newfoundland. He was killed on duty January 27, 2004 in Afghanistan while serving with the Royal Canadian Regiments 3rd Battalion, during a Suicide Bomber attack in the western district of Kabul.

 "Jamie was a proud Canadian soldier who was honoured to wear his uniform. He was a person who when he walked into any room, his smile brought warmth, joy and happiness to everyone. Above anything else Jamie was first a son, uncle, and friend."


Private Braun Scott Woodfield

Son of Daniel and Beverley Woodfield of Cambridge, Ontario. He served with the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, and was killed November 24, 2005 when the LAV he was riding in rolled over in a ravine near Laghman, outside of Kandahar.

Born in Victoria BC, he was raised in Eastern Passage NS and also had lived in Cow Bay NS. He joined the military in April 2003 and served a six-week peacekeeping stint in Haiti in 2004. The unmarried young man had just signed up for three more years of duty. After his time in service, he hoped to work in firefighting or search and rescue.


Corporal Paul James Davis

Son of Connie Elizabeth Davis and Jim Davis of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. He died from injuries suffered during a vehicle rollover on March, 2, 2006 while serving with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

Cpl. Davis was born in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia and grew up in Sackville. He joined the military in January 1998 and served a six-month peacekeeping tour to Bosnia-Hercegovina ending in 2001.

Cpl. Davis's father Jim said at a memorial ceremony for his son that this help with his grief.
"Grief itself doesn't get any better. We just learn how to cope, You've got to be able to talk about it and get it out."


Master Corporal Timothy James Wilson

Son of Dale Albert and Jane Wilson of Longbow Lake, Ontario. He died from injuries sustained in a traffic accident on March 2, 2006 that killed Cpl Paul Davis and injured five others. He was serving with the 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

He was born in Grande Prairie AB and lived in Rainbow Lake and Calgary before moving at age 9 to Langruth MB where he enjoyed life on the family farm. He joined the military in 1997 and served tours of duty in Bosnia-Hercegovina and Afghanistan prior to this last deployment. Full military funeral service held at CFB Shilo on March 13, 2006. In November 2007, the Government of the Province of Manitoba announced that a lake in northwestern Manitoba has been named in his honour. Timothy Wilson Lake is located 75 km northeast of Flin Flon.


Private Robert Howard Costall

Son of Bonnie Costall of Gibsons, BC. Pte Costall died following a firefight with insurgents in northern Helmand province, approximately 110 km northwest of Kandahar, Afghanistan. He was serving with the 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

He was born in Thunder Bay, ON and grew up in Gibsons, BC. He was an avid hockey player before joining the military at 19. Funeral for Pte Costall was held at Christian Life Assembly Church in Gibsons, BC on April 6, 2006. 


Corporal Matthew David James Dinning

Son of Lincoln and Laurie Grace Dinning of Wingham, Ontario. He was one of four Canadians killed when their G-Wagon was blown onto its side by a roadside bomb near Gumbad, north of Kandahar, Afghanistan on April 22, 2006. He was serving with 2 Military Police Platoon at the time.

Matthew was an active participant in many community activities growing up including hockey with the Wingham Minor Hockey Association. Matthew expressed an early interest in service to his country, specifically as a member of the military. His father, an OPP Constable had served in Kosovo with the United Nations previously.


Lieutenant William Montague Turner

Lieutenant Turner of Edmonton, Alberta was one of four Canadians killed when their G-Wagon was blown onto its side by a roadside bomb near Gumbad, north of Kandahar, Afghanistan on April 22, 2006. He was serving with the The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery.

Lt Turner was born in Toronto and worked as a Canada Post letter carrier in Edmonton before being deployed to Afghanistan. He also ran triathlons and belonged to a local bike racing club. Private funeral was held May 1, 2006 at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch in Erin, ON.


Corporal Randy Joseph Payne

Son of Dave and Nancee Payne of Peterborough, Ontario. He was one of four Canadians killed when their G-Wagon was blown onto its side by a roadside bomb near Gumbad, north of Kandahar, Afghanistan on April 22, 2006. He was serving with the Military Police at the time. 

Cpl Payne survived the initial blast but died after emergency surgery at the hospital at the Kandahar air base. He was born in Lahr, Germany, while his military family was stationed there. He lived in Gananoque, Ontario during his teenage years and later lived there with his wife and young children. He joined the armed forces in May 2003. Funeral was held May 1, 2006 at Grace United Church in Gananoque. Private interment service.


Corporal (Bombardier) Myles Stanley John Mansell

Son of Alan and Nancy Mansell of Victoria, British Columbia.  He was one of four Canadians killed when their G-Wagon was blown onto its side by a roadside bomb near Gumbad, north of Kandahar, Afghanistan on April 22, 2006. He was serving with the 5th (British Columbia) Field Artillery Regiment.

Bdr Mansell dreamt of becoming a soldier for much of his life, working his way up through the cadet ranks to become a reservist after graduating from high school in 1998. More than 1,000 mourners, including hundreds of army reservists and friends, attended the funeral service at Victoria's Christ Church Cathedral on May 3, 2006.


Captain Nichola Kathleen Sarah Goddard

Daughter of Tim and Sally Goddard of Calgary, Alberta. Goddard was killed on May 17, 2006, during a firefight in the Panjwaye District. She was serving with the 1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. Captain Goddard was also the first female combat solider killed in Canadian History. 

Nicknamed "Carebear", by her ski team in Nova Scotia, her hobbies included cross-country skiing and running, and she had competed in biathlon events. She led a local Scout troop with her fiancé (later husband), Jason Beam, while they were officer cadets at the Royal Military College, in Kingston, Ontario and owned two dogs and two cats.


Corporal Anthony Joseph Boneca

Son of Antonio and Shirley Boneca of Thunder Bay, Ontario. He was killed April 30, 2002 during a firefight with Taliban insurgents near the village of Pashmul, approximately 25 kilometres west of Kandahar, Afghanistan. He was serving with the The Lake Superior Scottish Regiment.

He enlisted in April 2002 and his second tour of Afghanistan. He was scheduled to return home in three weeks and had looked forward to the homecoming with his large extended family. Cpl Boneca is remembered for his interest in music, paintball, fishing and any athletic activity that challenged him to his limits. 


Corporal Francisco Oliver Gomez

Son of George and Joan Gomez of Edmonton, Alberta. He and Cpl Jason Warren were killed, and eight other soldiers injured, in a suicide vehicle attack on their combat service support convoy that occurred on Highway One about five kilometres west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. He was serving with 1st Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

Cpl Gomez spent 23 years in the army, much of it in the elite Airborne Regiment serving in Somalia until the unit was disbanded after the mission, also in Bosnia and Cyprus. He was known as a modest, unassuming man, who shunned promotions for the simple pleasure of remaining a corporal, the working rank of a soldier. He was awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD) and Special Service Medal (SSM).


Corporal Jason Patrick Warren

Son of Gerald and Deborah Warren of Kanata, Ontario. He and Cpl Francisco Gomez were killed, and eight other soldiers injured, in a suicide vehicle attack on their combat service support convoy that occurred on Highway One about five kilometres west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. 

Cpl Warren grew up in Quebec City. His grandfather, a Second World War vet, was an Air Force brigadier-general and his sister is a corporal who has served two tours in Afghanistan.and moved to Montreal at age 18. Trained earlier as a graphic artist, he joined the famous Black Watch reserve regiment and also served with the Royal 22nd Regiment in Bosnia in 2002. His six-month deployment was slated to end in August but he became the first member of the Black Watch Regiment to die in action since 1970. 


Corporal Bryce Jeffery Keller

Son of Mel and Helen Keller of Regina, Saskatchewan. Cpl Keller, Sgt Vaughan Ingram and Pte Kevin Dallaire were killed and six other Canadian soldiers injured as the result of a rocket-propelled grenade attack by Taliban militants near the village of Pashmul, approximately 25 kilometres south west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. The men were only weeks from completing their six-month tours and returning to Canada.

"On 3 August 2006, while exposed to intense enemy fire in Afghanistan, Cpl Keller demonstrated courage and leadership in order to allow his comrades to attend to a critically wounded soldier. Sadly, Cpl Keller made the ultimate sacrifice that day, but his selfless actions contributed to saving lives and enabled his platoon to hold vital terrain until reinforcements arrived."


He would be awarded the Medal of Military Valour for his actions here, while serving with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, R.C.I.C.

At the cemetery after funeral on Aug 15, 2006, a military honour guard fired three volleys in salute to Keller and a bugler played the mournful notes of the Last Post. Cpl Keller's widow, Cpl Sarah Keller, accepted her husband's beret, medals and a folded Canadian flag.
 


Corporal Christopher Jonathan Reid

Son of Thomas and Angela Reid of Truro, Nova Scotia. Cpl Reid was killed, and another soldier injured, when their light armoured vehicle struck an improvised explosive device near the village of Pashmul, approximately 25 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City. He was serving with the 1st Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

Cpl Reid joined Truro's army reserves, the Nova Scotia Highlanders, in 1989 and then enlisted with the regular army in 1995. He later served across Canada and overseas, where he completed tours in Bosnia and Croatia. His awards include the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD). He had survived a Taliban attack in May that killed his friend Capt Nichola Goddard.


Private Kevin Yves Royal Dallaire

Son of Gaétan and Diane Dallaire of Calgary, Alberta. Pte Dallaire, and two others were killed along with six others being injured as the result of a rocket-propelled grenade attack by Taliban militants near the village of Pashmul,  west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. He was serving with  1st Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

On October 25, 2006 Pte Dallaire received a posthumous award of Mention in Dispatches. Citation:

"Pte Dallaire was deployed with 9 Platoon, C Company, 1 PPCLI Battle Group during Operation ARCHER Rotation 1. On August 3, 2006, during combat operations in the Pashmul region of Afghanistan, he exposed himself to great personal risk to provide cover fire for his section. Traversing an open field under enemy fire, Pte Dallaire directed his section to keep moving until it reached its destination safely while he provided cover fire. His actions reflect the highest standard of his regiment and the Canadian Forces." 
 


Sergeant Vaughan Ingram

Son of Clayton and Linda Ingram of St. John's, Newfoundland. Sgt. Ingram, and two others were killed along with six others being injured as the result of a rocket-propelled grenade attack by Taliban militants near the village of Pashmul, west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. He was serving with 1st Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

In a ceremony  at the town's cenotaph, Sgt Ingram's medals and beret were given to his five-year-old daughter. Another flag was presented to his 13-year-old daughter. On June 4, 2008 Sgt Ingram received a posthumous award of Mention in Dispatches. A mention in dispatches, marked by a small bronze oak leaf attached to a service medal, recognizes "valiant conduct, devotion to duty or other distinguished service".


Master Corporal Raymond Friedrich Arndt

Son of Walter and Shirley Arndt of Peers, Alberta. He was travelling in a convoy delivering medical supplies to combat troops on the front lines when his vehicle was involved in a head-on collision with a civilian truck. Three other soldiers were injured, one very seriously, in the accident southeast of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. He was serving with the The Loyal Edmonton Regiment (4th Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry).

After six years of infantry training with the "Loyal Eddies", MCpl Arndt finally got his wish to serve overseas when he was sent to Afghanistan in early 2006. He was just 11 days shy of returning from his six-month deployment.


Master Corporal Jeffrey Scott Walsh

Son of Benjamin Morris and Margie Walsh of Regina, Saskatchewan. Walsh was killed on August 9th, 2006 when on a routine patrol in a G-Wagon. A gun accidentally discharged while travelling along a bumpy road outside of Kandahar fatally wounding him in the process. He was serving with 2nd Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

Over 300 people attended MCpl Walsh's funeral service on Aug 17, 2006 at St. Paul's Cathedral in Regina. The family followed behind his casket, which was draped in a Canadian flag and carried in by his fellow soldiers. There were tears and laughter as stories were told of his good nature, sense of humour, love of family and devotion to duty. On June 26, 2008 MCpl Walsh received a posthumous award of Mention in Dispatches. A mention in dispatches, marked by a small bronze oak leaf attached to a service medal, recognizes "valiant conduct, devotion to duty or other distinguished service".


Corporal Andrew James Eykelenboom

Son of Hans and Maureen Eykelenboom of Comox, British Columbia. He was killed by a suicide bomber in a vehicle attack while travelling with a NATO resupply convoy near the town of Spin Boldak,  southeast of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. He was serving as a member of the 1 Field Ambulance.

Cpl Eykelenboom is the first Canadian military medic killed in action since the Korean War. His six-month tour was almost over when he died and he looked forward to his return in less than a month to relax with family and meet his new baby nephew. His family allowed the release of the last email and photo he sent to his parents:

"Hi Mom and Dad: Well, I finally got the picture you have been waiting for. About two weeks ago a little girl brought her infant sister to the Unit Medical Station while I was on duty. She had 2nd degree burns on her hand from touching a kettle. I bandaged her hand and after gave a doll that your friend made to her. She instantly stopped crying and started sucking on the nose of the doll. A special thanks goes from her older sister to your friend for such a wonderful gift; and a thanks from me for being the one to accept her gratitude. Making the children happy is the most rewarding thing about this tour. Love Andrew"


Corporal David Robert William Braun

Son of Patty Braun of Watson, Saskatchewan.  Cpl. Braun was killed by a suicide bomber while on patrol in Kandahar, Afghanistan, on August 22, 2006. He was a member of the 2nd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

Cpl Braun was raised in Raymore SK and worked in Watson SK before realizing his dream of joining the armed forces in February 2002. His mother recalled how, when home on leave, he used to go the school his hometown and talk to students about his work in the forces. He was so passionate about his job, she said, that he managed to hold the attention of a roomful of unruly kids. More than 600 mourners gathered at the local school on Aug 31, 2006 for the funeral service.


Sergeant Shane Hank Stachnik

Son of Hank and Avril Stachnik of Waskatenau, Alberta. He was one of four Canadian soldiers killed and nine others wounded during heavy fighting as part of Operation Medusa a major International Security Assistance Force air and ground offensive against Taliban insurgents approximately 15 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on September 3, 2006. He was serving with the 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment.

Sgt Stachnik served in five overseas tours – twice in Bosnia, as a member of the Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) in Sri Lanka for the tsunami efforts and Afghanistan twice. His awards and medals include the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD). At a memorial service in Waskatenau, his sister said Shane was very popular among fellow soldiers easing tense situations with his quick wit. He loved his Harley and looked forward to one last ride before winter.


Warrant Officer Frank Robert Mellish

Son of Barry and Sandra Lynne Mellish of Truro, Nova Scotia. He was one of four Canadian soldiers killed and nine others wounded during heavy fighting as part of Operation Medusa a major International Security Assistance Force air and ground offensive against Taliban insurgents approximately 15 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on September 3, 2006. This was his 7th tour during his 18 years of service, he was serving with 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment.

WO Mellish previously served in the Canadian Airborne Regiment and was on his seventh overseas deployment. His family stated that he loved NASCAR, working with his hands, and anything else that let him spend time with his boys. He spent much of his leave prior to deploying putting the finishing touches on the new family home and teaching his sons how to ride their new dirt bikes. About 1,000 people, including the premier and lieutenant-governor, packed St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church in Summerside, PEI for the funeral on September 12, 2006.


Warrant Officer Richard Francis Nolan

Son of Maureen Agnus Nolan of Mount Pearl, Newfoundland. He was one of four Canadian soldiers killed and nine others wounded during heavy fighting as part of Operation Medusa a major International Security Assistance Force air and ground offensive against Taliban insurgents approximately 15 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on September 3, 2006. He was serving with 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. 

WO Nolan was from Newfoundland but had lived in Ontario for the last 20 years. He had only been in Afghanistan six weeks when he was killed, but was a veteran peacekeeper who served in Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Afghanistan on a previous tour.


Private William Jonathan James Cushley

Son of Errol and Elaine Stephanie Cushley of Port Lambton, ON. He was one of four Canadian soldiers killed and nine others wounded during heavy fighting as part of Operation Medusa a major International Security Assistance Force air and ground offensive against Taliban insurgents approximately 15 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on September 3, 2006. He was serving with 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. 

Some 500 people attended the funeral at Sacred Heart Chuch in Port Lambton on Sept 13, 2006. As the hearse passed by Sacred Heart elementary school, from which he had graduated only seven years before, the entire student body lined up on the curb, most dressed in red, all wearing arm bands that read 'Thank you Will'. Some waved Canadian flags or tossed flowers. Other than a few muffled sobs, the 145 youngsters stood silently as the procession, which was more than 100 metres long, passed by.


Private Mark Anthony Graham

Son of Albert and Linda Joyce Learn Graham of Hamilton, Ontario. On September 4, 2006 Graham was killed in a friendly fire incident when two USAF A-10 Thunderbolts fired on his platoon, having mistaken them for Taliban insurgents. He was serving with 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. 

When he was growing up he was always active and loved to play soccer, baseball, ride his bicycle or just plain run at Olympic Park. He grew up to become a world-class runner who competed for Canada in the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. There is now the Mark Anthony Graham Memorial Olympic Park dedicated to him in his


Corporal Shane Patrick Keating

Son of Judith Anne Budd of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. He was one of four soldiers killed, and several injured, when a man travelling on a bicycle detonated his bomb near Canadian troops on foot patrol in the Panjwayi district, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. A number of civilians, including children, were also injured in the attack. He was serving with 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. 

Cpl Keating was born in Estevan SK and grew up in Dalmeny where he attended high school until grade 12 when his family moved to Saskatoon. He was a member of the North Saskatchewan Regiment from June 2, 1993 to September 1, 1997, when he joined the regular forces. Shane previously served two tours in Bosnia and had been stationed in Afghanistan since August 1, 2006.


Corporal Glen Harold Arnold

Son of George and Leona Arnold of McKerrow, Ontario. He was one of four soldiers killed, and several injured, when a man travelling on a bicycle detonated his bomb near Canadian troops on foot patrol in the Panjwayi district, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. A number of civilians, including children, were also injured in the attack. He was serving with 2nd Field Ambulance. 

Cpl Arnold had served for 14 years during which he was deployed to Bosnia-Herzegovina, as a member of DART (Disaster Assistance Response Team) in Sri Lanka and one previous tour in Afghanistan.


Corporal Keith Ian Morley

Son of Russel and Della Marie Morley of St. Paul, Manitoba. Corporal Keith Ian Morley was killed in the Panjawi District of Afghanistan on September 18, 2006, while serving with A Company, 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry from Shilo, Manitoba. He was one of four members of the Canadian Armed Forces killed as a result of a suicide bicycle bombing while on foot patrol in the district. 

Before going to Afghanistan, Cpl Morley served two tours in Bosnia in 2001 and 2003. He loved the outdoors, and enjoyed hiking and fishing, as well as woodworking.


Private David Robert James Byers

Son of John Leslie and Katherine Jane Byers of Espanola, Ontario. He was one of four soldiers killed, and several injured, on September 18, 2006 when a man travelling on a bicycle detonated his bomb near Canadian troops on foot patrol in the Panjwayi district, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. A number of civilians, including children, were also injured in the attack. He was serving with 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. 

David was happy and proud to be part of the Canadian Forces, and he volunteered for the mission in Kandahar. He felt he had found his niche in life and that the mission in Afghanistan was an important and profound one.


Private Joshua James Klukie

Son of Carol Klukie of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Pte Klukie was killed September 29, 2006 when he stepped on a booby-trapped explosive device while on foot patrol in the Panjwayi district west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. The explosive was big enough to be an anti-tank mine and thought to have been planted by Taliban militant insurgents. A second soldier suffered minor hearing loss as a result of the blast. He was serving with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment. 

He was among the fittest soldiers in his platoon and one commander said Klukie was destined to do great things. Friends recalled him as a sensitive soul who was usually the first to recognize when someone was troubled.


Corporal Robert Thomas James Mitchell

Son of Robert and Carol Mitchell of Owen Sound, Ontario. Cpl Mitchell and Sgt Craig Gillam were killed and five others injured on October 3, 2006 after they were attacked by mortars, rocket propelled grenades and small arms fire from insurgents while they provided security to a construction project in the Panjwayi area west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. This occurred in an area from where Taliban fighters had been cleared just weeks earlier.

Known to his friends as Jim, he had his first military posting in Edmonton before returning to Ontario with the Royal Canadian Dragoons.


Sergeant Craig Paul Gillam

Son of Graham and Agnes Bishop. Husband of Maureen Jessica Gillam. Sgt Craig Gillam and Cpl Mitchell  of the Royal Canadian Dragoons were killed and five others injured on October 3, 2006 after they were attacked by mortars, rocket propelled grenades and small arms fire from insurgents while they provided security to a construction project in the Panjwayi area west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. This occurred in an area from where Taliban fighters had been cleared just weeks earlier. Sgt Gilliam was honoured with a posthumous Mention in Dispatches. The citation reads:

"On October 3, 2006, Sergeant Gillam's observation post in Pashmul, Afghanistan, was attacked by enemy fighters firing small arms and rocket-propelled grenades from an unidentified location. Without regard to his own safety, Sgt Gillam immediately moved to a position from which he could identify and indicate the enemy position to the remainder of his patrol. He valiantly stood his ground and maintained suppressing fire until he fell to the enemy's fire. Sgt Gillam's courageous actions and personal sacrifice during a devastating enemy attack contributed to saving the lives of his fellow soldiers through the rapid identification of the enemy position."


Private Mark Andrew Wilson

Son of Carl and Carolyn Margaret Anne Wilson of Killarney, ON. Trooper Wilson was a gunner inside an armoured vehicle that struck a mine or a roadside bomb in the Panjwaii district west of Kandahar,  He died of his injuries October 7, 2006 the same area where two Canadian soldiers were killed and five others were wounded in an attack on just days prior.

A member of the Royal Canadian Dragoons based out of Petawawa, Ontario, Wilson joined the army late in life but expressed many times that it was the thing he loved to do the most.


Private Blake Neil Williamson

Son of Heather Anderson of Kemptville, Ontario. Pte Williamson and Sgt Darcy Telford were killed, and two others wounded, on October 7, 2006 in an ambush by militants using rocket-propelled grenades. Their unit was providing security for construction of the new Panjwayi development road near Pashmul, about 25 kilometres west of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Other Canadian units quickly responded to the attack and became involved in a three-hour battle with insurgents. International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) helicopters were also called in to help. The four-kilometre stretch had been the site of a number of attacks and four other Canadian soldiers died in that area in the previous 16 days. He was a member of 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. Pte Williamson joined the armed forces in 2003 and was on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan.


Sergeant Darcy Scott Tedford

Son of Robin and Paulette Tedford of Truro, Nova Scotia. Sgt Darcy Telford and Pte Williamson were killed, and two others wounded, on October 7, 2006 in an ambush by militants using rocket-propelled grenades. Their unit was providing security for construction of the new Panjwayi development road near Pashmul, about 25 kilometres west of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Other Canadian units quickly responded to the attack and became involved in a three-hour battle with insurgents. International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) helicopters were also called in to help. The four-kilometre stretch had been the site of a number of attacks and four other Canadian soldiers died in that area in the previous 16 days. He was a member of 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment. 

A 14 year veteran of the armed forces, he previously served in Kosovo and was on his second tour of duty in Afghanistan. He was a recipient of the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD).


Corporal Albert Hugh Storm

Son of Albert and Beverley Storm of Fort Erie, ON.  He and CWO Robert Girouard were killed when their Bison light armoured personnel carrier was attacked by a suicide bomber as they traveled near Kandahar Airfield base in Afghanistan. He was at the time serving with with the 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment. 

Cpl Storm was born in Niagara Falls and raised in Fort Erie, ON. He served as a cadet prior to enlisting on September 6, 1990. He was a decorated soldier three years away from retirement who served in various trouble spots around the world. He was stationed previously in Bosnia twice, in Croatia and CFB Alert. His family described him as a strapping young man who liked to fish, loved his family and served his country with pride.

Cpl Storm's mother had passed away years earlier and he was divorced. The Memorial Cross (previously granted only to mothers and widows of the fallen) was presented to his eleven year old daughter, the youngest ever recipient.


Chief Warrant Officer Robert Michel Joseph Girouard

Son of Vincent and Mabel Girouard of Bathhurst NB. Chief Warrant Officer Robert Michel Girouard was killed by a suicide car bomber while on duty near Kandahar, Afghanistan, on November 27, 2006. He was serving as the regimental sergeant major for the 1st Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group that was serving there at the time. He was 46 years old and a 29-year veteran of the Canadian Armed Forces. He was awarded the Meritorious Service Cross posthumously.

CWO Girouard joined the militia at age 17. He served 29 years in such places as Germany, Kosovo and Bosnia. He started his tour in Afghanistan in August and had just enjoyed a three-week leave with his family in Canada before returning to duty six days before his death. CWO Girouard was posthumously awarded a Meritorious Service Cross.

The citation reads:
"throughout his tour of duty, up to the moment he was killed in action on November 27, 2006, he led from the front, sharing the dangers and hardships associated with combat operations. He contributed greatly to the Battle Group's fighting spirit, which led to the defeat of the enemy during Operation MEDUSA. Chief Warrant Officer Girouard's outstanding leadership, professionalism and courage brought singular credit to the Canadian Forces and to Canada." 


Corporal Ronald Kevin Megeney

Son of Ronald and Karen Anne Megeney of Stellarton, Nova Scotia. Cpl Megeney died after being shot in the chest March 6, 2007 while in his tent at Kandahar Airfield military base. A military jury found a fellow soldier guilty of criminal negligence causing death and negligent performance of a military duty in the death of Cpl Megeney. He was found not guilty of manslaughter. He was later sentenced to four years in prison and dismissal from the Canadian Forces. 

Cpl Megeney's sister Lisa told reporters her brother was excited to be going to Afghanistan. "He said that he was going to help people," she said. "He wanted to turn things around, so the Afghanis could live like we live.… He took so much pride in it."


Master Corporal Christopher Paul Stannix

Son of Lieutenant-Colonel Ken Stannix and Kate Stannix. He was one of six Canadian soldiers killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War. He also accepted a temporary reduction in rank to Corporal to serve with the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment battle group.

MCpl Stannix joined the army reserves in 2000 and was on his first tour. Six months earlier, he trained with U.S. marines and Navy Seals in Virginia to prepare for his voluntary deployment. He also accepted a temporary reduction in rank to Corporal to serve with the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment battle group. 


Private Kevin Vincent Kennedy

Son of Catherine Ann and Myles Michael Kennedy of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland. He was one of five soldiers who were from the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment that were killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle, 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War.  Pte Kennedy was an elite athlete and navy cadet in high school and intent on a career in the military.

His mother said about him after his death “He was a wonderful young man, very patriotic, loved his country. He was very kind, very giving, and always thought about the underdog. He always wanted to be there to help people, and especially those people in Afghanistan.”


Private David Robert Greenslade

Son of Donald and Lauren Gail Greenslade of Saint John, New Brunswick. He was one of five soldiers who were from the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment that were killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle, 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War. 

Pte Greenslade was remembered by comrades as an avid movie buff and golf fanatic who entertained his platoon by singing hip hop. His local highschool, which he left at 16 for the Army has a fund in his name and a memorial garden. He is well remembered at home. 


Sergeant Donald Jason Lucas

Son of Fred and Ella Ross Lucas of St. John, Newfoundland. He was one of five soldiers who were from the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment that were killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle, 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War. Sgt Lucas had served several previous overseas tours and was remembered as an excellent leader. He was awarded the Canadian Forces Decoration (CD), Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal, Sacrifice Medal (Posthumous).

Over 1,000 mourners filled the Church for his private service, Brig.-Gen. Rick Parsons talked about Sgt.Lucas saying "He was an outstanding soldier and highly regarded by those soldiers he commanded, He was a soldier that his soldiers that served with him would follow him anywhere, and as a military person, you couldn't ask for a higher compliment."


Corporal Brent Donald Poland

Son of Donald Eldridge and Patricia Evelyn Poland of Camlachie, ON. He was one of five soldiers who were from the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment that were killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle, 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War.

“In his thirties, Brent chose to follow his heart and his passion. He enlisted in the Canadian Forces where he volunteered for a career as an infantry soldier,” the statement said. The family’s statement said that Poland wanted to bring peace to the people of Afghanistan and that he was inspired by the thought that his efforts would give Afghan women the chance to go to school and be free from oppression.

Chief Warrant Officer Wayne O’Toole, served as Sergeant-Major for Hotel Company, and remarked fondly about him “Cpl. Poland was an intense soldier. He would be intense just digging a hole,” O’Toole said.


Corporal Aaron Edward Williams

Son of Edward and Kristine Williams of Perth-Andover NB. He was one of five soldiers who were from the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment that were killed April 8, 2007 after a roadside bomb exploded near their light-armoured vehicle, 75 km west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan. Four soldiers survived the attack, although one had serious injuries. They were serving with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in a major offensive against the Taliban. It was the largest single-day combat death toll suffered by Canadian troops since the Korean War.

Cpl Williams trained as a sniper and is remembered as a serious and staunch soldier. Williams' friend Jameson Ferguson, reflected on the tragedy.
"Proud. That is how I remember Aaron Williams. He was proud to be a soldier and to be fighting for his country. He never questioned his mission, Aaron was only 23 and had his whole life ahead of him with a little girl and plans to marry in the fall. He gave all that for us and we could never thank him enough for that."
He said Williams was someone "who loved his family, hockey, hunting and his motorcycle. He was popular and the type of friend who was always there for you no matter what." 
"Aaron we love you and you will be missed."


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Vancouver Island, CA

About us

The War Dungeon is a private collection and museum on Vancouver Island, BC. Over the past several years, with the help of friends and family, we have renovated the basement of our home into a large museum. The displays here cover from the Boer War, all the way to the Vietnam War of the 1960s.  

We try to cover all aspects and countries involved wherever possible, and we are always looking to add new and interesting displays to help honor the men and women who sacrificed so much for us. We offer guided  tours upon request as well as on site displays for special occasions.

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